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5 edition of Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5) found in the catalog.

Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5)

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Published by Ams Pr Inc .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages76
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7474355M
ISBN 100404157610
ISBN 109780404157616

Native American Ethnobotany A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. Search the database. The database of ethnobotanical uses can now be searched using two different methods. A traditional text search provides basic text searching with experimental Boolean search features. INDIAN MEDICINE By Lee Standing Bear Moore andTakatoka Do not do it. We do not advocate the replacement of professional medical intervention with the information provided here. The practice of herbal medicine is a science, not a pastime. Milkweed Navajo women drank a tea prepared of the whole plant after childbirth. American Mistletoe.


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Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5) by Leland C. Wyman Download PDF EPUB FB2

The University of New Mexico Bulletin NAVAJO INDIAN MEDICAL ETHNOBOTANY By Leland C. Wyman and Stuart K. Harris _____ _____ THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO BULLETIN Whole Number June 1, Anthropological Series, Volume 3, No.

5 Published monthly by the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, new Mexico. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wyman, Leland Clifton, Navajo Indian medical ethnobotany. [New York: AMS Press, ] (OCoLC) Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wyman, Leland Clifton, Navajo Indian medical ethnobotany.

Albuquerque, N.M., University of New Mexico Press, Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5): Medicine & Health Science Books @ hor: Leland C. Wyman. Navajo Indian medical ethnobotany by Wyman, Leland Clifton, Leland C.

Wyman, Stuart K. Harris,AMS Press edition, in English - [1st AMS ed.]Pages: University of New Mexico Bulleting: Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (Anthropological Series, Volume 3, No.

5) Unknown Binding – January 1, See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. The Amazon Book Review Author Manufacturer: University of New Mexico Press. Get the best deals on Navajo US Native American Books (Now) Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany by Wyman & Harris— Un.

of NM Reprot. $ Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany book shipping. Make Offer - NAVAJO INDIAN SERVICE FIELD BOOK. The Navajo (/ ˈ n æ v. h oʊ, ˈ n ɑː-/; British English: Navaho; Navajo: Diné or Naabeehó) are a Native American people Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany book the Southwestern United States.

At more thanenrolled tribal members as ofthe Navajo Nation is the second-largest federally recognized tribe in the U.S.

(the Cherokee Nation being the largest) and has the largest reservation in the country. Books shelved as navajo: Dance Hall of the Dead by Tony Hillerman, The Ghostway by Tony Hillerman, Skinwalkers by Tony Hillerman, The Shape Shifter by To.

This book is valuable to both amateur and seasoned botanist in the Southwest, in addition to others interested in health remedies and Navajo folklore and culture. Published by Navajo community College Press. Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5); Leland C.

Wyman, Stuart K. Harris. Abronia fragrans (snowball-sand verbena), used medicinally for boils and taken internally when a spider was swallowed. The Kayenta Navajo use it as a cathartic, for insect bites, as a sudorific, as an emetic, for stomach cramps, and as a general panacea. The Ramah Navajo use it as a lotion for sores or sore mouth and to bathe perspiring feet.; Acer glabrum var.

glabrum (Rocky. Navajo Nation Health Foundations was run in Ganado solely by Navajo people. In expressing identity in the medical community, the Navajo Nation took advantage of the National Health Planning and Resources Development Act to create the Navajo Health Systems Agency inbeing the only American Indian group to do so during that time.

The Navajo experience with cancer provides an occasion to examine how a biomedical category and the attendant elements of causal reasoning are taken up. Title: Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Volume 1, Issue 7 Ethnobotany of the Navajo Issue 8 of Monograph (School of American Research (Santa Fe, N.M.))) Volume 1, Issue 7 of Monograph series / University of New Mexico, New Mexico University Issue 8 of Monographs of the School of American Research.

Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5) by Leland C. Wyman, Stuart K. Harris ISBN (). Books shelved as ethnobotany: Native American Ethnobotany by Daniel E. Moerman, Plants of the Gods: Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers by R.

Louisa also began translating and transcribing Navajo legends and folk tales. And because she spoke Navajo fluently, Louisa eventually became an intermediary between the military, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Navajos. Louisa became a popular lecturer on all things Navajo and began traveling extensively.

An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more than : $ Blog.

7 May Designer tips, volume 2: Common color mistakes and the rule; 6 May Create marketing content that resonates with Prezi Video. Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5) Stella Young,Nonabah Gorman. Bryan,Charles Keetsie.

Shirley Navajo Native Dyes: Their Preparation and Use. Kathryn Phillips Paradise by Design: Native Plants and the New American Landscape. Arthur Caswell Parker,William N. Fenton (Editor). Please use the "Inquiry Form" tab below to request a title you find on the site and I'll do my best to find the book and get it to you in a timely manner.

Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany. Plants, People and Culture: The Science of Ethnobotany $ The domestication and exploitation of plants and animals $ Arizona Flora. Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany.

Publications in Biology No. 3, University of New Mexico. Yazzie, Helen Yellowman, Regina Yazzie, Roseann Willink, Caroline Bemore, Jefferson Clauschee and Peggy Rafelito () "Da: the Navajo Distributive Plural Preverb," in Fernald and Hale () pp.

Young, Robert W. The largest Indian reservation in the United States, the Navajo Nation stretches from the rim of the Grand Canyon in the west to the peach orchards of Farmington, New Mexico, in the east; from empty highways around Holbrook, Arizona, in the south.

Native Americans are renowned for their medicinal plant knowledge. It is rumored they first started using plants and herbs for healing after watching animals eat certain plants when they were sick. In order to protect these plants from over harvesting, the medicine men used to pick every third plant they found.

The reference books listed in this section provide information about various aspects of Navajo traditions and culture. Content includes narratives/stories, summary information with illustrations, ceremonial/religious/artistic information and illustrations, and cultural taboos.

Research Library Eclectic Medicine. A Journal of Therapeutic Facts For The Busy Doctor, E. Jones: Bulletin #5 A Handy Reference Book ( kb) Favorite Remedies From the Lloyd Brothers (kb) Echinacea in the Treatment of the Bites of Venomous Serpents, Reptiles, and Insects Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany.

Wyman, L.C., & Harris, S.K. Lloyd, J.U., Reprinted From the Eclectic Medical Journal (64kb) Echinacea in the Treatment of the Bites of Venomous Serpents, Reptiles, and.

In Native American Medicinal Plants, anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman describes the medicinal use of more than plants by Native American ation—adapted from the same research used to create the monumental Native American Ethnobotany—includes 82 categories of medicinal uses, ranging from analgesics, contraceptives, gastrointestinal aids, hypotensive /5(59).

Ethnobotany of the Middle Columbia River Native Americans - Traditional uses of native plants in central Washington state. Includes subsistence patterns, land use, fibers, textiles, and building materials. By the Prophet of the Earth - Ethnobotany of the Pima - A complete online version of the original printed book by L.S.M.

Curtin. "Historically, ethnobotany and forest conservation projects have not been conducted with public health and medical projects," King and coauthors noted in the book Valuing Local Knowledge: Indigenous People and Intellectual Property Rights. A short history, in reverse order: This database is the result of a series of efforts over 25 years.

A book based on the data base has been published by Timber Press, in Portland OR in To see the introductory material. sample pages, and reviews, look at Native American Ethnobotany. The list price of the book (which has pages) is $ Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 2 () 88 Elsevier Sequoia S.A., Lausanne -Printed in the Netherlands A STUDY OF THE MEDICAL ETHNOBOTANY OF THE ZUNI INDIANS OF NEW MEXICO SCOTT CAMAZINE Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (U.S.A.) ROBERT A.

BYE Department ofEnvironmental, Population and Cited by: Navajo Indian medicine: implications for healing. Coulehan JL. Traditional medicine men coexist with physicians and hospitals on square mile Navajo Indian Reservation.

Most seriously ill Navajos utilize both systems of health care. This natural experiment of coexistence emphasizes several general characteristics of all by: Search. Upload. Sign In Join. A study of the medical ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians of New Mexico. Camazine S, Bye RA.

This paper examines the medical ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians of west-central New Mexico. Historically, these people were hunters and gatherers, and later, farmers and by:   Wyman LC, Harris SK () Navajo Indian medical ethnobotany.

Univ NM Bull Anthropol Ser –76 Google Scholar Wyman LC, Harris SK () The ethnobotany of the Kayenta Navaho: an analysis of the John and Louisa Wetherill Ethnobotanical by: the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries; "he studied medicine at Harvard".

Native American peoples developed a sophisticated plant‐based medical system in the ten millennia before the European conquest of America.

Although there were significant differences between the systems developed by the many native groups, about which many fine works have been written, there were also many broad similarities which will be detailed here.

But Lozada and Wei do not live in a developing country — they are physicians for the Indian Health Service (IHS), providing free health care to patients of the Navajo Nation at Gallup Indian Medical Center (GIMC) in New Mexico.

"I use almost every single thing I learned in residency on a daily basis," says Wei. Handbook of Northeastern Indian medicinal plants. James A. Duke leaf decoction leaf tea Lobelia Lumbee Malecite medicine Menominee Mentha Meskwaki Michx Micmac Moerman Mohegan Monarda Montagnai Navajo Nepeta Ojibwa pain Panax parturition Penobscot Pinus plant poison Polygonum Populus Medical Ethnobotany Ethnobotany/ Northeastern States.

Ellmore, Francis H. ETHNOBOTANY of the NAVAJO: A Monograph of the Uni-versity of New Mexico and the School of American Research. Albuquerque: Uni-versity of New Mexico Press. () First printing in wrappers with on the cover. Study based on seven years of field research, in which over plants were identified.Navajo Long Walk: The Tragic Story of a Proud People's Forced March from Their Homeland by Joseph Bruchac, Shonto Begay (Illustrator) (School & Library Binding) Navajo Indian Medical Ethnobotany (University of New Mexico Bulletin Anthropological Series, Vol 3, No 5) by Leland C.

Wyman, Stuart K. Harris. One Hundred Years of Navajo Rugs.Navajo or Navaho (both: nä´vəhō), Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Athabascan branch of the Nadene linguistic stock (see Native American languages).A migration from the North to the Southwest area is thought to have occurred in the past because of an affiliation with N Athabascan speakers; the Navajo settled among the Pueblo and also .